Photos from March for Our Lives

Photos from March for Our Lives

sinkhole attended rallies in Seattle, WA and Orlando, FL. This is what we saw.

UPDATED 8:34 am 3/26/18 to include photos from Portland, ME.

Though sinkhole is not exactly (okay: not at all) a news organization, Saturday’s global March for Our Lives rallies and marches felt significant enough for us to tuck our Press cards into our fedoras and venture out with our smartphones and cameras. We attended the marches in Seattle (50,000 protesters) and Orlando (20,000 protesters), because that’s where we live, and though we mostly just observed and took pictures, we did have a few opportunities to speak to folks about why they were there.

Victor, a middle-aged white man in full hunter’s regalia, told us that “there’s no sporting reason for anybody to have an AR-15.” His sign, which read “Hunters for Enhanced Background Checks” on the front, had attracted us while we waited for the march to start in Cal Anderson Park in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood, not because of its message, but because of the artwork Victor included on the backside: Elmer Fudd, as we walked past, was mooning us.

Connor and Morley, meanwhile, a pair of teachers whose signs referenced their opposition to the proposal to arm teachers, said they were marching to support their students.

We also spoke with Paul, a counter-protester, who stood at 4th and Pine in the heart of downtown Seattle with a simple sign that read, “Gun Control means Government Control of the People.” Paul, who was friendly and quiet, told us he was attending the march because governments kill more people than guns, and he felt it important to remind people of this.

In Orlando, we spoke with Jennifer, 44, who was marching with her daughter, Allie, 10, along with her friend, Nisha, 42, and her daughter, Saaya, 8. As they stood in front of City Hall with their signs, Jennifer told us they were marching “to raise our voices, to fight for our kids, to fight for you.”

The mood at both marches was friendly and urgent, and the weather was grand. We’ve been struck by some of the photos we’ve seen from other marches, and by a CBS News poll, released on Sunday, which found that 89 percent of young Americans (ages 18-29) believe they can change, or are already changing, the world. We’d agree with this.

For more photos from the marches, follow us on Instagram.

At Cal Anderson Park in Seattle, WA. March 24th, 2018. credit: Makayla Esposito

In downtown Orlando, FL. March 24th, 2018. credit: Madison Bernath

In downtown Seattle, March 24th, 2018. credit: Makayla Esposito

In Portland, ME. March 24th, 2018. Courtesy: Haleigh Doyle

In downtown Seattle, March 24th, 2018. credit: Makayla Esposito

 In downtown Orlando, FL. March 24th, 2018.  credit: Madison Bernath

In downtown Orlando, FL. March 24th, 2018. credit: Madison Bernath

In downtown Seattle, March 24th, 2018. credit: Makayla Esposito

In downtown Seattle, March 24th, 2018. credit: Makayla Esposito

At Lake Eola in Orlando, FL. March 24th, 2018. credit: Rachel Kolman

In the Belltown neighborhood in Seattle, WA. March 24th, 2018. credit: Makayla Esposito

In Portland, ME. March 24th, 2018. Courtesy: Haleigh Doyle

In front of the Space Needle in Seattle, WA. March 24th, 2018. credit: Makayla Esposito

In downtown Orlando, FL. March 24th, 2018. credit: Rachel Kolman

header image: at the Seattle Center in Seattle, WA. March 24th, 2018.

On gun control, we’re missing the forest for the trees.

On gun control, we’re missing the forest for the trees.

The American public has power over the gun business – why doesn’t it use it?

The American public has power over the gun business – why doesn’t it use it?